Who runs the world? Women, if we want prosperity, sustainability and life

On International Women’s Day, MSc Climate Change, Management and Finance student Cecilia L’Ecluse considers why it is that the changes brought about by global warming will be a disproportionate burden on women – and why women’s leadership and involvement is key to the future of our planet. Following severe flooding in Bangaladesh in 1991, nine times more women than men died. In May 2008, cyclone Nargis … Continue reading Who runs the world? Women, if we want prosperity, sustainability and life

En route to Marrakech: From the Atlas mountains to the Atlantic Ocean

Science and Solutions for a Changing Planet DTP student Oliver Schmidt is attending the UN Climate Change conference (COP22) this week. He shares his impression of the host country Morocco and how it may be affected by climate change. Before the “action” COP officially kicked off in Marrakech on Monday, I travelled to the Kingdom of Morocco to get a personal perspective of this year’s … Continue reading En route to Marrakech: From the Atlas mountains to the Atlantic Ocean

Wavering water: why round-the-clock urban water supply matters

Grantham PhD student Simon De Stercke looks at how Mumbai residents cope with just a few hours of running water per day – and why this needs to change, as part of his research on the urban water-energy nexus. By 2050, two thirds of our planet’s population will live in cities. Creating a blueprint for sustainable cities is therefore the key to unlocking a sustainable … Continue reading Wavering water: why round-the-clock urban water supply matters

How eating less meat could help prevent extinction, climate change, cancer and the next pandemic

  Grantham Lecturer in Global Change Ecology, Dr Kris Murray, explains why, from farm to fork, less is more when it comes to meat. I’m not a vegetarian, and I’m unlikely to become one any time soon. I like making sausages and barbequing ribs, I love prosciutto crudo and lamb kebabs, and I’m a total sucker for a bit of bacon in my lettuce and … Continue reading How eating less meat could help prevent extinction, climate change, cancer and the next pandemic

What is China doing to protect and improve the environment?

Grantham Institute Head of Policy and Translation, Alyssa Gilbert, joined a group of Imperial College London students and staff on a trip to China. At Beijing’s Tsing Hua University, she saw a passion for protecting the natural environment at odds with the country’s pursuit of economic growth. Like all universities, Imperial encourages international discourse and collaboration between academics and students across the globe. I recently … Continue reading What is China doing to protect and improve the environment?

Seven ways maths can save the world

  Can numbers, algebra and trigonometry save the planet? This was the question put to experts during a panel discussion at Imperial hosted by the Grantham Institute and the Mathematics of Planet Earth CDT. CDT students Paula Rowińska and Tom Bendall report back on seven ways that mathematicians are already working towards securing our planet’s future. From meteorology to economics, a wealth of scientific research … Continue reading Seven ways maths can save the world

Before the flood: protecting London’s future

Grantham Affiliate Dr Ana Mijic examines London’s vulnerability to flooding, and the infrastructure projects safeguarding the city’s future. This month saw the launch of Flood Re, a new UK government-backed scheme intended to lower the cost of insuring homes in high-risk areas against flood . Whilst the scheme will benefit thousands, as always, prevention – in the form of well though-out adaptation plans – is … Continue reading Before the flood: protecting London’s future

Picking up the pieces: studying forest fragmentation in Borneo

SSCP-DTP student Phil Chapman writes about why fragmentation is threatening tropical forests, how researchers are learning more about the problem and what it’s really like to live and work in a jungle for four months. I am now two months into my second field season in the lovely, but oh-so-very far away land of Borneo, to be precise the Malaysian state of Sabah. Full details … Continue reading Picking up the pieces: studying forest fragmentation in Borneo

Losing a bet but winning the war: fighting the deadly chytrid fungi

On World Wildlife Day, Grantham Lecturer Dr Kris Murray explains why a US ban on salamander imports is critical to stemming the spread of a new lethal amphibian disease. I‘m not usually one for gambling, and certainly not for placing bets that I genuinely hope to lose. But last year I made a bet with a colleague that I ended up losing more quickly than … Continue reading Losing a bet but winning the war: fighting the deadly chytrid fungi